Interpret a bar chart here.

What is the most popular bike sold?

What is the least popular bike sold?

How many bikes were sold altogether?

What is the difference in the number of bikes sold between the most and least popular?

What title would you give this graph?

Use these sites to make your own bar chart:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks2bitesize/maths/flash/interpretingdata.swf

http://www.amblesideprimary.com/ambleweb/mentalmaths/grapher.html

http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/default.aspx?ID=308c797f88cd41c1a80b96ea1bf3fe7c

Year 4 Do Market Research!

In our numeracy work this week we are carrying out market research to help us design our new chocolate bar.

An important skill that we have been developing is choosing which data to collect in order to answer a question.

We have received a letter and have been data collecting to respond to this letter.

Dear Bearwood Pupils,

Thank you very much for your recent visit to Cadbury’s World. Whist you were on
site one of my  managers (Chris Smith) over heard a child saying that they would be designing their own chocolate bar once they returned to school.
Coincedentally, Cadburys are actually just about to design and launch a new chocolate product too.
Since you all seemed so knowledgeable I am writing to ask for your assistance.
I would like you to launch a new product at Bearwood Primary School and if it is successful then I will consider launching this product into the Cadburys range.
I would like you to be creative. The chocolate product should not already exist in the Cadburys range, or in the ranges of our competitors. You must first do some market research to find out about the chocolate eating habits of the children at Bearwood and find out what they would like in a new product.
Please record a presentation of your findings when you have finished so that I can have an update on your progress.

Regards,
Alan Palmer,
Director of Cadburys.

So far we have written our surveys and started collecting data. Later in the week we will be presenting our data in graphs and interpreting our findings.

Aztec Art

[slideshow]

Aztecs had many types of art and artists like stone-workers, who carved statues; scribes, who painted pictograms; potters, who would make pots for various things; and feather-workers, who would create beautiful head dresses among other things.

The stone-workers would create statues from rocks and would create objects made from green jade, black obsidian, and transparent crystals. Stone-workers were trained from an early age and the skills they learned were passed on from worker to worker. To carve a statue they would use simple tools made out of wood, rock and bone.

The scribes would draw the pictograms that would record events. First the scribe would sketch a rough outline, then they would add the details. The Aztecs would use vegetables, insects, shells, and minerals to create colors and oil could be added to make colours brighter.

The feathers that were used for elaborate things such as a headdress which were made from tropical birds. The feathers were worked into designs. The Aztec feather workers would make clothing out of feathers from all sorts of tropical birds for nobility and royalty.


We have been analysing adverts.

Yesterday and today we have been analysing adverts to spot the common features.

Can you remember some of the features that we found? Write a comment below to share the features you know.

After this we ‘diamond ranked’ some adverts as a group to decide which we thought were the most effective and why.

[slideshow]